All posts tagged “cartography

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Project: Streetcars and Electric Railways in Portland, 1920

It’s safe to say that I’m fascinated with the rich transit history of my adopted hometown of Portland, Oregon, and it’s certainly something that I’ve explored before in a previous project. This new project started out with a very simple goal – to produce a route map of Portland streetcars at their zenith in 1920 that showed each line separately – but it quickly grew into something much more.

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New Vintage Map: 1931 Birds-Eye View of Berlin, Germany

1931_berlin_800px

After much work, I’ve finally finished digitally restoring another vintage rail transit map, this time a superb birds-eye pictorial map of Berlin, Germany in 1931. It’s full of awesome details (as you’ll see in some close up images below) and clearly shows the major railroads circling the city as red and white dashed lines, complete with little station sheds and labels for the major bahnhofs.

Prints for sale from $28 Zoomable Preview of Map

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New Vintage Map: Bird’s-Eye View of Chicago, 1898

1898 Chicago - Large

I don’t normally give vintage maps that I’ve digitally restored their own blog post, but this one is just too amazing not to share in full detail. It’s an absolutely stunning bird’s-eye view of central Chicago in 1898 – just one year after the opening of the elevated Union Loop – and it has some of the most intricate detail that I’ve ever seen in one of these maps. Every building, factory, railroad station, streetcar, train, horse, tree and lamp post in the city seems to be shown with absolute precision and clarity.

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Zoomable On-line Previews of my Transit Maps

To say I’m excited about this is an understatement. Thanks to Stuart MacMillan — who very kindly spent the time to show me exactly how this all works — I’ve now implemented awesome zoomable, scrollable versions of many of my transit map designs here on the site. Serving large images on the web has always been problematic (especially when there’s more pixels in the image than can fit on the screen at one time!), and this seems to be the most elegant solution that I’ve seen so far.

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Project: McKinney Avenue Trolley Map (Dallas, Texas)

McKinney Ave Trolley - Current Service

Here’s a small project that was inspired by a message to my Transit Maps blog about the currently existing map for the McKinney Avenue heritage trolley line in Dallas, Texas. As you can see in the gallery below, it could use a little help. However, rather than review and criticise a map produced for a non-profit organisation (most likely by a volunteer or staff in their spare time), I thought that I would create a new, accurate, more user-friendly map instead. While produced as a design exercise for my own benefit, I’m hopeful that the McKinney Avenue Transit Authority (MATA) might consider adopting it as their official map.

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U.S. Highways Map selected for NACIS “Atlas of Design”

U.S. Routes as a Subway Map

[Cross Post from Transit Maps]

Hey, everyone! I’m thrilled to be able to share some news with you that I just heard about! My U.S. Highways as Subway Map has been accepted for inclusion in the inaugural edition of the NACIS Atlas of Design. There were 150 entries, and only 27 maps – all by different creators – have been accepted, so you can see why I’m excited about this!

The Atlas itself promises to be superb, as evidenced by this excerpt from the project website:

The Atlas will feature a gallery of full-color maps showcasing cartography at its most beautiful, its cleverest, its sharpest, and its most intriguing. But it will be more than a museum of images; each map will be accompanied by thoughtful commentary that guides the reader toward a deeper understanding of the work: its inspiration and message, the ways it means to influence us. It is well to look upon something beautiful and good, but once we understand how it is beautiful and good, our experience becomes much richer. For those of us who make maps, we can carry those lessons into our own work and advance the craft of cartography. Even if you don’t make maps, it’s a chance to gain insight into what mapmakers really do, and to see how it’s about more than just pushing city dots and rivers around. Everyday objects become much more significant when we see what is behind their creation.

I can’t wait to see the other maps! If you need a recap, here’s the map’s project page on this site, and here’s a link to a larger image of the map. And of course, prints of the map are still available for sale in my secure on-line store.